Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 1.319 IF 1.319
  • IF 5-year value: 1.299 IF 5-year 1.299
  • CiteScore value: 1.27 CiteScore 1.27
  • SNIP value: 0.740 SNIP 0.740
  • SJR value: 0.598 SJR 0.598
  • IPP value: 1.21 IPP 1.21
  • h5-index value: 12 h5-index 12
  • Scimago H index value: 6 Scimago H index 6
GI cover
Chief-executive editor:
Jothiram
Vivekanandan
Executive editors:
Ari-Matti
Harri
&
Håkan
Svedhem
Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) is an open-access interdisciplinary electronic journal for swift publication of original articles and short communications in the area of geoscientific instruments. It covers three main areas: (i) atmospheric and geospace sciences, (ii) earth science, and (iii) ocean science. A unique feature of the journal is the emphasis on synergy between science and technology that facilitates advances in GI.
News
New Journal Impact Factors released 27 Jun 2018

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

New article processing charges for GI 05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

The presence of magnetic fields in space dominate the way planets interact with different types of plasmas. Thus, measuring them is extremely important when studying space. We present an instrument capable of measuring magnetic fields at a fraction of the cost, power and size of traditional magnetometers. With this technology, a science-grade magnetometer for small satellites can be achieved, enabling the study of the space environment with large clusters of sensors in future missions.

Leonardo H. Regoli, Mark B. Moldwin, Matthew Pellioni, Bret Bronner, Kelsey Hite, Arie Sheinker, and Brandon M. Ponder

The term system-of-systems with respect to observational capabilities is frequently used, but what does it mean and how can it be assessed? Here, we define one possible interpretation of a system-of-systems architecture that is based upon demonstrable aspects of observing capabilities. We develop a set of assessment strands and then apply these to a set of atmospheric observational networks to decide which observations may be suitable for characterising satellite platforms in future work.

Peter W. Thorne, Fabio Madonna, Joerg Schulz, Tim Oakley, Bruce Ingleby, Marco Rosoldi, Emanuele Tramutola, Antti Arola, Matthias Buschmann, Anna C. Mikalsen, Richard Davy, Corinne Voces, Karin Kreher, Martine De Maziere, and Gelsomina Pappalardo

This work describes a new approach to use fast X-ray fluorescence mapping as a tool for automated mineralogy applied on thin sections of plutonic rocks. Using a supervised classification of the spectral information, mineral maps are obtained for modal mineralogy and image analysis. The results are compared to a conventional method for automated mineralogy, which is scanning electron microscopy with mineral liberation analyzer, showing a good overall accuracy of 76 %.

Wilhelm Nikonow and Dieter Rammlmair

This paper introduces a hands-on, low-cost device (German industrial property right no. 20 2014 106 048.0) that uses common adapters to mount p-ED-XRF devices so that these can provide bulk-sedimentary chemistry data from non-destructive measurements at the surface of a split sediment core or from other solid samples. The strength of combining p-ED-XRF analyses with this new sample chamber is demonstrated by exemplary sediment cores from an archaeological research project.

Philipp Hoelzmann, Torsten Klein, Frank Kutz, and Brigitta Schütt

A numerical inversion approach to detect and localize inclusions in thick walls under quasi-periodic natural solicitations is presented. It is based on a preliminary analysis of surface temperature field evolution with time. This analysis is improved by taking advantage of a priori information provided by ground-penetrating radar reconstructions. In this way, it is possible to improve the accuracy of the images achievable with the stand-alone thermal reconstruction method.

Nicolas Le Touz, Jean Dumoulin, Gianluca Gennarelli, and Francesco Soldovieri

Publications Copernicus